Will you enjoy a career in pharmacy?

Do you really want to do this?  Do you really want to be a pharmacist?  If you finish a full PharmD (Doctor of Pharmacy) Professional Degree program – you’re looking at around four years of your entire life.  Even less if you attend an accelerated program, but it is a big investment in time and money regardless.  It would be all for nothing if you decide you dislike being a pharmacist after working for only a short period of time.  If you decide to change careers midway through pharmacy school, or shortly after you graduate, you would have to spend additional time and money searching for a new career that you may or may not enjoy compared to a career in pharmacy.  This is why it is very important to do your research in this industry by doing some reading into this field, talking to current pharmacists and pharmacy students, talking to your trusted family members, advisors, and friends, or even your school’s career counselor, and other available and legitimate resources on the Internet.  Working as in intern in the pharmacy department within a hospital or a retail setting before applying to pharmacy school is a great way to receive some real exposure to the life, and get some hands-on experience.  This is a good method of testing whether the pharmacy world is a good fit for you…and whether you’ll be able to endure the next 30-40 years of it…assuming you work until retirement.  Therefore, a little investment in your time to do some preliminary research will go a long way for the rest of your life.  You’ll spend generally eight hours of your day (a third of a full day) if employed full-time, and so it may be beneficial to find out if this career path will bring happiness or dread.

The following may be some indicators that you’ll be content with the pharmacy field:

  • Enjoy working with people of all personalities
  • Enjoy providing customer service to everyone
  • Enjoy learning new things
  • Independent
  • Thick-skinned
  • Disciplined
  • Patient
  • Intelligent, and the passion to seek knowledge and find answers quickly
  • Enjoy science
  • Enjoy working in a busy environment
  • Teaching and training

If you possess the opposite traits from those listed above, you may want to rethink this career, or at least do some more research and work in a pharmacy before you decide to invest more time and money into it.  Keep in mind that although the majority of pharmacists work in a retail drugstore or a hospital setting, there are other career paths such as academia, insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, research, and consulting.  Pharmacists are known to  be valued for their knowledge on medications, insurance, general science, and some various aspects of healthcare, which is why their skills and knowledge may be utilized in various industry sectors.  To learn about atypical careers outside of the hospital or retail pharmacy setting, it may be a good idea to inquire from your pharmacy schools before you apply on the available elective courses and experiential programs they offer.  You could also inquire about the teachers and professors about their backgrounds to see if your career interests have any relation to their employment history.  They may be able to mentor or advise you on certain career paths based on their own experiences.  Therefore, not only is it a good idea to do some research into the work of a pharmacist, it is an equally sound idea to research the schools you are interested in applying to, and whether they offer special elective courses and experiential programs that will assist you in your pursuit of the your ideal job.

 

 

Complaints in Hospital Pharmacy

Have you ever worked in a hospital pharmacy?  It is much different from working in a retail setting, and it is highly recommended to volunteer or spend some time as a technician before you decide to devote your entire career in this setting.  Hospital pharmacies are usually referred to as inpatient pharmacy.  Although hospitals may have an outpatient pharmacy, which is similar to a retail setting, most people generally think of inpatient pharmacies when thinking about a hospital pharmacy setting.  The inpatient pharmacy serves medications generally for patients who have a room and bed.  Therefore, their policies, protocols, and systems are designed to serve in this capacity depending on the type of medical services offered at the hospital, and the size (e.g. number of rooms and patients) that can be admitted to a hospital.  Many hospital pharmacies require new hires to have experience in a residency if they’ve had no prior hospital experience as a pharmacist.  This may be due to the expanding role of a pharmacist to include clinical duties in areas of anticoagulation, infectious diseases, emergency room support, pediatrics, oncology, and many others.  These “clinical” services being offered by clinical pharmacists are becoming appreciated by other healthcare professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses) and patients as they offer educational services about novel medications to staff, provide optimal medication recommendations in regards to effectiveness and safety for complex treatments as medicines become more and more complicated over time, and even ensure the cost-effectiveness of such treatment in some cases.

The above all sounds great on paper, but unless you have worked in a hospital pharmacy operation, you may not know what you’re getting yourself into.  There are nuances to understand in hospital pharmacy that you may not have to deal with as often or at all in retail pharmacy.  Here, we compile some of the many complaints that could arise in a hospital pharmacy operation in a full-service, or general hospital.

  1.  The schedule.  Full-service general hospitals don’t usually close…they can be open 24 hours a day.  Therefore, pharmacies are usually staffed around-the-clock which means pharmacists will need to work around-the-clock also in shifts.  Sometimes these shifts are not desirable if you’re stuck with the midnight to morning shift.  Sometimes they are not the most preferred if stuck working on weekends or on holidays when you would rather be with your family or have a social life.
  2. Call-outs.  Similar to above, when other members of the pharmacy call out sick, or go on vacation, maternity leave,  you may have to cover them or be asked to take their shift. This happens often as people will always get sick, and workers will always take vacation.
  3. Lack of communication.  When a prior shift (e.g. a morning pharmacist) is working on something important and complex, but does not communicate what they worked on to the next shift pharmacist (e.g. evening pharmacist) for a job they did not finish before they leave the pharmacy to go home.  You can imagine the results when a doctor or nurse calls about the order being worked on by the morning pharmacist, but the evening shift has no clue what they are talking about.
  4. Staff shortages.  Without proper staffing, a hospital pharmacist will be overwhelmed and perform the job of 2-3 pharmacists and technicians.  This is risky because it could lead to errors and fatigue.
  5. Nurses. Nurses want the medication quickly, and may not always provide enough time for the pharmacist to process and send the medication after the order is sent to the pharmacy.  They may not understand that only a few pharmacists manage and review the medications for proper dosing and safety for the entire hospital.  Also, some medications require further processing, such as mixing in the correct diluent, etc.
  6. Missing medications.  Sometimes, even after medications are sent, nurses cannot find the delivered medications…thus requiring pharmacists to scramble and look for the medications in the pharmacy to see if they were sent up.  This wastes a lot of time, and results in duplicative work.  Many times, those missing medications are later found by the nurses themselves because they may not have looked in the correct locations, or when another nurse takes the delivered medication without telling the other nurses who are looking for the medication (lack of communication).

The above are only some of the scenarios of things that may lead to complaints by hospital pharmacists.  Obviously, it is highly recommended to have some exposure in this setting before embarking on this career path.

How To Get The Most Out Of Pharmacy School


If you could do it all over again…what would you do?

When asked this question, there is one recommendation many seasoned pharmacists agree on: to participate in more extracurricular activities such as clubs and organizations. Networking, socializing, making friends is important, and joining clubs, organizations, and participating in activities may be the easiest and preferred way to accomplish this.  This will be very important for the rest of your life, and perhaps in your career. In the real world, it is much more difficult to make the time to go out and socialize and make new friends, build new relationships after you are immersed in the cycle of life which includes getting married, finding a job, learning the new job, starting a family, and raising your children, etc. Having the time to hang out with your friends, or go out and make new ones will be difficult as you start getting older, and worrying about how to find a babysitter, what to cook, or who will pick up the kids from daycare. By the time your daily routine is over after managing your children, shopping for groceries, cooking and cleaning, you may be too tired to do anything else but to lay on your couch, and watch your television shows…and falling asleep. Your few years in pharmacy may seem overwhelming in the beginning, but it will fly by really quickly, and compared to all of the unexpected stresses you’ll encounter after pharmacy school, it will be a piece of cake. You may never see most of your classmates again, and despite the long hours studying for those tough exams, you’ll probably never have it as easy life compared to when you’re still in school. Therefore, aside from focusing solely on your studies, try to make an effort to smile and make new friends by participating in activities, clubs, organizations, and attending other social events. There will be many opportunities in pharmacy school, and taking advantage of it will be to your benefit, especially since you’re paying a lot of tuition for it.

There are many organizations and activities available for pharmacy students such joining an organization focused on the student pharmacist, a state pharmacist, national hospital pharmacist, health professional, professional pharmacy fraternity/sorority, religion-based pharmacy, community service associations or organizations, pharmacy school government, special pharmacy school committees, and so on. Pharmacy schools may offer various social events such as dance nights, charity auctions, volunteering opportunities, social events with other health professional schools (medical, nursing, dental), events to a baseball game, or even a college sporting event. In fact, this is something you could inquire about during your visit to the pharmacy school(s) from senior pharmacy students, to know what programs or organizations are offered at the school, and which clubs they recommend joining. Networking through these events and organizations is also another great way to get job referrals, and meet new employers, and learn about the trade. Remember, you’ll never be this young again to enjoy the student life, so it is a good idea to make the most out of your short time in school. People skills and the understanding of how to socialize and network will probably be one of the most important assets you possess as you move up the career ladder. Who knows…you may even find your future wife or husband this way, and it is probably a lot easier to meet a potential new spouse in school compared to dating websites and apps, or in life beyond school where your time outside of work is limited. Therefore, make the most of your pharmacy school experience. Study hard…but make sure you also build new relationships.

What Gives Pharmacists Job Satisfaction?

No one wants to wake up early in the morning everyday for the next thirty years until they retire.  Most pharmacists or other professionals would probably not work for free, and without receiving a paycheck.  We all work mostly because we need to earn money to pay for expenses such as housing, debts, tuition, clothes, car, insurance, credit card bills, etc.  Not many would do this for out of the goodness of their heart unless they already have a pot of gold in their bank accounts, and the freedom to spend their time to volunteer their services without pay.  But for the majority of us who will never win the lottery, or get lucky at the casinos and races, or have inherited wealth passed down from prior generations, we have to work for a very long time to support our needs, our family needs, and to save enough money to retire. Therefore, like it or not, most of us will have to work. However, going to work does not have to be miserable or unsatisfactory.  You don’t necessarily need to dread your life until you retire because there are many things pharmacists like about their job, which provide them a sense of career fulfillment and job satisfaction.  We will highlight some of these here.

Helping patients provide pharmacists provide a high degree of job satisfaction.  Pharmacists are known to be one of the most trusted and objective healthcare professionals from the viewpoint of patients for their vast knowledge of medications and human science, as well as knowledge about cost-saving measures to pay for medications.  Pharmacists may recommend cheap over-the-counter medications to patients for conditions that may only require self-care, and inform patients about coupons or medication rebate eligibilities for those that cannot afford medications or are unaware of such cost-saving tactics.  They will also warn patients about potential drug interactions and side effects that may occur for medications which will protect patients, and help them avoid serious conditions.  When a pharmacist catches an error (such as a contraindicated medication, or a medication that could cause an allergic reaction) before it reaches the patient, thus, saving the patient from suffering, there is a sense of relief knowing that the their work potentially saved someone’s life, or helped reduce serious harm.  They are also valued members of their respective communities as patients and customers come to know the pharmacists over time, and seek their advice, which is generally free, and does not require an appointment or an insurance co-pay as a medical doctor would require.

 

Pharmacists are valued members of the healthcare profession.  Nurses and doctors may seek their advice in the hospital setting for recommendations on appropriate medication selection for patients with unique conditions, proper preparation of medications, management of medication adverse events, and calculation of dosages for complex medications.  Being able to provide recommendations to prescribers which will optimize and affect patient care provide pharmacists with a great sense of satisfaction.  This teamwork also allows pharmacists to network, and meet with other members of the health profession which in turn allows pharmacists to learn from other professionals.

Job stability is another area of job satisfaction.  Pharmacists are paid relatively well compared to the national average salary rates in the United States. It is considered a stable occupation which requires a license in each state for the pharmacist to practice.  Working in a licensed profession in itself usually limits the number of potential workers in a field – meaning not everyone can work as a pharmacist regardless of whether they want to or not.  Each state has different licensure requirements which generally requires having passed a national licensure exam, a state law exam, graduation from an accredited pharmacy school, and paying the required fees.  The stability of having a well paying job which requires a license to practice provides pharmacists a sense of stability, and perhaps less lost sleep at night not having to worry about layoffs compared to many other jobs.

 

What you can do after getting a PharmD

So you finally earned your Doctor of Pharmacy degree after sitting through 3-4 years of mind-numbing lectures on cytochrome p450 enzymes, vancomycin dosing nomograms, and reading through hundreds of adverse effects, contraindications, dosage/administration, and mechanism of action information about drugs.  You also secured a hefty loan from a lender where now the interest on the loan will start adding to the principle.  First of all, congratulations on finishing pharmacy school and getting your degree.  It is no small feat, and the patience, discipline, hard work, and fortitude required to achieve a PharmD will have prepared you to become a professional working contributor to society, which will help facilitate and advance your career.

So now what?  If you haven’t already begun (perhaps six months prior to graduation in seeking a job or a post-graduate position (residency, fellowship, etc) then you should probably begin searching for a job.  Apply to jobs within a state in which you plan living in, and obtain the necessary requirements by referring to the State Board of Pharmacy for each state, which will guide you on what you need to start practicing as a pharmacist.  Usually, this will require a state exam (MPJE for most), and the national pharmacy licensure exam (NAPLEX).  Apply to as many jobs as you are able to, and begin studying for your tests so that you’ll be eligible to start working if you are fortunate enough to be accepted for a position.  Many employers would want to know that you have the required eligibility and license to practice as a pharmacist before they would even consider granting an interview.  Post-graduate programs such as residencies and fellowships may not require this since interviews with those programs may begin long before graduation.

Ok, so now you have earned your state pharmacy license(s) to practice, and you have hopefully found a job.  You’ve made it!  You can now start to apply for health insurance benefits, contribute to your retirement plan, pay off those high interest college loans, help out your family,  and maybe consider replacing that broken-down car of yours.  You may finally get to go out with your friends and eat something nice for once rather than looking for the cheapest item on the menu, or sticking with the cup-o-noodles and peanut butter sandwiches that you feasted on through college.  Hopefully, your bank account statements will look nicer each month as long as you save some of your income, and if you don’t spend more than you earn.  Now what? You’ll notice after a couple years of working as a pharmacist that it’s pretty much the same old same old everyday whether you work in the retail or hospital setting.  As a retail pharmacist, you’ll come to work with dozens of refills to process, and insurance companies to call when the claims are rejected.  You’ll constantly talk to angry customers waiting to pick up prescriptions that are not ready for them, or even misfiled.  You’ll have pharmacy technicians not report to work on time, or call-in sick which will almost certainly lead to a very stressful morning.  You’ll deal with slippery situations when you feel a prescription is forged, or if customers are being prescribed too much narcotics for their pain, but yet are  yelling at you because they want their pain medications immediately while you ponder what to do.  As for hospital pharmacists, you’ll deal constantly with nurses on the phone calling you for missing medications which was supposed to be sent hours ago, and which you may have already sent twice but somehow kept getting lost.  You’ll deal with your coworkers calling in sick requiring you to do another double shift.  These are some examples of situations that await you after pharmacy school.  Generally, the pay appears to be very good at first.  However, you’ll notice the salaries plateauing and not increasing as they may do for other occupations.  Even after many years, you may not earn much more than when you first started your position after graduation.  As your life progresses and you get older, you’ll probably be getting married at some point, have kids, and buy a new home.  You’ll wonder if you’re able to earn more income, and if there other ways to better your position, of if doing the same old same old stagnant job every day is it for you until you retire.  Of course, this applies to pharmacists who are unsatisfied and want more out of their careers.  There are many pharmacists who are okay with the same old same old status quo until they retire, and may not care to do anything else.

There are some options you have that may put you in a better position to excel or move up the ladder.  Opportunities for leadership positions such as a manager or director of the pharmacy, or a different type of industry altogether such as pursuing a career in consulting ,or an atypical pharmacist position are some options for you.  Applying for these positions may require either experience or degrees and certifications, or both.  If moving up the ladder to management positions, a masters in business administration (MBA) or a masters in public health (MPH) may be a good start, or something to put on your resume.  There are many pharmacy schools that offer a dual degree program combined with a PharmD, but since you’ve already graduated, perhaps you could check your benefits department to see if they would subsidize part of your tuition if you decide to obtain another degree.  If you’re interested in pursuing the clinical route, asking your management whether board of pharmacy specialty certifications will earn them more income, or whether the exams and certification fees can be reimbursed by the employer may be appropriate considering the costs required to obtain the certification.  Networking with other similar health professionals by joining an organization, attending or participating in meetings and events (continuing education) is another great way to learn about other opportunities that you would otherwise not know of when using only the internet or job sites.  Networking can be the most formidable tool you have if you are able to establish relationships easily.   Attending classes or joining clubs which focus on helping you network may be beneficial for you such as courses that educate people how to perform presentations (e.g. toastmasters).

These are only some of the options that are available for those that feel stagnant in their careers.  Keep in mind that pursuing another graduate degree, or a board specialty certification could be costly, and may take your time away from your family or social life.  Work/life balance is something that has to be assessed by each pharmacist depending on their life situation and age.