Tips to avoid getting stuck in the retail pharmacy setting


Many pharmacists have asked how they could get out of retail pharmacy.  Well, first of all, not getting stuck there in the first place is the easiest way to avoid it.  For example, if you are confident that you do not see yourself in a retail pharmacy position in the long run, try to work in the clinical setting right out of pharmacy school.  Many pharmacists in a retail pharmacy setting may find themselves in a bind because they want to earn money as quickly as possible to provide for themselves and their families, or paying off debts after toiling in pharmacy school for years and losing money to pay for tuition and its compounding interest.  This may be fine in the short run to take care of financial issues, but the long term career aspirations and goals may be compromised, stunted, or delayed by years for doing so.  Therefore, for those of you not interested in a retail pharmacy career, it may be beneficial to work towards a non-retail (e.g. clinical) career early on as long as financial issues could be deferred for a few more years after graduation.  Just like anything else in life, preparing and planning early may allow one to avoid long term regrets.  Here are some tips to land a clinical gig after pharmacy school.

Aim for a pharmacy internship or technician position in a hospital before or during pharmacy school to gain exposure to the work and services provided by a hospital pharmacy.  Learning how to compound intravenous admixtures, total parenteral admixtures, answering frantic phone calls, working with nurses, filling medication carts, and delivering medications to dispensing cabinets may provide a good comprehensive background of what to expect in the clinical setting.

Networking with other hospital inclined pharmacy students, professors, and pharmacists is a great way to get connected to the hospital world.  Networking with them may provide helpful and interesting tips and assistance.  They may be the first to know about hospital job openings at their own hospital, and even refer you to the right hiring managers so that you may receive a proper introduction.  Networking, regardless or pharmacy settings, is probably one of the most powerful tools at your disposal for any type of career and job.  Be sure to participate in relevant organizations, clubs, and social activities to expose yourself to meeting new people who may be of assistance later on.  For those that have already been in retail pharmacy for some time, and are having a difficult time landing a hospital pharmacy position, networking is probably one of the best ways to transition over to the clinical setting.  Joining a local hospital pharmacy organization, and attending local pharmacy conferences will allow one to network with many other local professionals, some who may work in the hospital setting, and provide you with tips and information about job openings.

Applying for a hospital residency or fellowship is another great way to get acclimated to the hospital environment.  After the conclusion of the residency and fellowship, a position may even be offered to you by your supervisor if there are openings upon successful completion of the residency or fellowship.  Having completed a residency is one of the best ways to be considered for a hospital position after graduation.  It may set you apart and above those that lack of a residency, or put you on par with those that have hospital experience.

Obtaining a board certification, such as board certified pharmacotherapy specialist (BCPS) may also beef up one’s resume to compete for the limited openings for hospital pharmacists.  This is not the easiest or cheapest route, but many hospitals appreciate the knowledge and skill provided by the BCPS pharmacist.  There are books and courses offered at pharmacy conferences dedicated to preparing pharmacists for this test.

 

 

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