What people say when I asked why they want to be a pharmacist


Throughout your journey to becoming a pharmacist, many people will ask you the same questions over and over again, “Why did you go into pharmacy,” or “Why become a pharmacist.”  They may be friends or family members, your dates and future spouses, teachers, coworkers, etc.  You will more than likely be asked this common question during pharmacy school interviews as they would probably want to know how you think and process things, and if that sort of reasoning and passion fits into the type of student they are looking for, or desire representing their school.  I’ve heard many reasons in their decision, and therefore I’ve compiled a couple popular ones (in no particular order), as well as my perspectives on their reasons, factoring in where I see the pharmacy career is evolving towards in the future.

Reason 1 :  “I want to help people”

This is the selfless answer.  But it is also the most cliche and boring response you can provide to any interviewer.  It lacks originality, is boring, and too commonplace.  You can give this answer in any healthcare professional program interview, and are almost sure to make the interviewer snooze or daydream during the interview.  This answer will definitely not make you stand out from the crowd of pharmacy candidates unless you have an original way of conveying how you can help people.  There isn’t much direct patient interaction in the majority of pharmacy careers, and compared to other healthcare professions such as nursing, medicine, or physical therapy, a career in pharmacy doesn’t really compare to these other health professions to actually help people “hands-on.”  Most of the help pharmacists provide are behind-the-scenes since many pharmacists work behind a retail (drug store) counter or secluded in the hospital setting.  In the drugstore setting, the extent of “helping people” involves processing a coupon for cheaper medications or calling the insurance provider to verify the claim can go through, and the drug can be covered assuming there are problems with coverage.  This is similar to an accountant helping people with their finances and taxes.  Also, every now and then, the pharmacist may provide the customer with patient counseling points and valuable drug information such as how to take the medicine (with food or not) and what other drugs to avoid while taking the drug at the same time, or recommendations on over-the-counter products they can use for their cough without the need for a prescription.  This type of interaction is very brief and limited, as the majority of the day involves processing and preparing prescriptions for pick-up, replenishing inventory, and processing insurance claims.  In the hospital setting, most pharmacists will be working in the basement or some other area where they are not seen, and either looking at a computer screen to check prescriptions that are sent electronically for accuracy, compound medications, or check the drugs prepared by the pharmacy technicians before being delivered.  They also spend a lot of time on the phone with nurses and sometimes doctors to answer questions such as the accounting of lost medications, drug dosage recommendations…but mostly nurses trying to find where the medications were sent or if they have even been processed.  Very little time is spent interacting with people outside of the pharmacy, unless there is an outpatient pharmacy (similar to the retail setting), or during rounds if the hospital offers a clinical pharmacy practice.  However, a clinical pharmacist position is very limiting in terms of “helping people” also because pharmacists cannot  prescribe or treat patients independently without a medical doctor’s supervision, and are pharmacists are probably limited to stating information to the medical team that can easily be found in an online drug information website.  Every now and then, they may get an interesting question, and some states may even allow limited prescribing similar to a physician assistant under the direct supervision of a licensed prescriber/doctor, but if you want to help people “hands-on”, it may be a better option to pursue a degree as a  medical doctor or a nurse if direct patient care and “helping people” hands-on are your number one reasons.

Reason 2:  “I want to have a good career”

The more self-centered answer, but one that may reveal blunt honesty.  Also a response that not many people will provide during an interview because it gives interviewers an image of what you want from the school (self-centered), rather than what you can do for the school, the community, and others (selfless).  Selfless is always more appreciated than self-centered by most.  However, this isn’t a post about interview strategy, but more on analyzing the validity of the reasons.  Pharmacy is a solid career if you can land a job, and has a lot of benefits such as a good salary, job stability, work/life balance, respect, and opportunities to learn and understand things.  I give the nod to pharmacy over medicine in terms of work/life balance at a younger age since you can immediately have a lot of time devote to having a life outside of your job, and immediately after graduation as opposed to a career as a doctor.  Medical doctors have to endure years of training in school;  after graduating, they may have to earn enough money to pay back mounting loans with compounding interest unless they have wealthy parents or supporters who will pay for the cost of tuition.  After graduation, other life events will need to be considered such as buying a house, having a family, and other expenses.  Certain medical specialities offer a rewarding salary after training is complete, and may allow one to pay off those higher loans a lot quickly in comparison to general medicine.  This may come in your mid to late thirties, or forties…whereas a pharmacist can enjoy a good salary, perhaps not as high as a medical doctor, in their mid twenties.  Pharmacists have respect from the community, but maybe not as much compared to medical doctors in the healthcare setting because medical doctors oversee the treatment of patients.  With the growing number of pharmacy schools being accredited in the past ten years, as well as the growing class sizes for existing schools, the job opportunities may not appear to be as plentiful as they once were more than a decade ago.  Signing bonuses and school loan reimbursement benefits are harder to find, and graduates are having a more difficult time in certain urban areas finding a position because of the higher competition compared to years prior.  If you are able to find and keep a full-time job as a pharmacist, I believe it can lead to a long and rewarding career.

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